Who we are


A brief History on us


CPRC actually has two histories: the history of the CPRC congregation since its birth in 1970 and the history of the CPRC building since 1898.

The history of CPRC congregation: CPRC is an English-speaking, multi-cultural congregation of the Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) in South Africa. The Dutch Reformed Church is a predominantly Afrikaans-speaking, historically white church. CPRC was founded in 1970 as an English-speaking congregation of the DRC, with Dr Gustav Bam as the founding minister. When dr Bam left in 1982 to accept the position of professor in pastoral theology at the University of Western Cape, Rev Dana Minnaar became the pastor of CPRC until his retirement in 1994. He was succeeded in 1995 by Dr Francois Wessels, who is the present pastor.

CPRC is an inner-city congregation. In our area a number of unemployed people live on the city streets. In our outreach to them, CPRC co-operates closely with Straatwerk and our partners in the Bread for Life project. Straatwerk has been reaching out to the homeless and unemployed on the streets of Cape Town since the 1970s They run, for example, Projek Opruim, through which they provide an opportunity to unemployed people to earn some money by cleaning the streets of Cape Town. In Bread for Life project, CPRC works together with its partners to provide a warm plate of food and a Bible message every Wednesday evening to around 120 homeless people.

The history of CPRC building: The CPRC building was built in the 1890s and inaugurated on Sunday 12 February 1898 as the Trinity Congregational Church, with Alexander Pitt as its first minister. The historical records tell us that on that day, 25 worshippers listened to the sermon of its first minister, Rev Alexander Pitt, and before they sat down at the communion table, they took hands and recited the following Commitment:



"We hereby unite ourselves together as a Christian church for the furtherance of the gospel of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ amongst men, and for mutual strength, comfort and help in the Christian life, and in token thereof do take one another's hands and sit down together at the memorial Supper of our Lord. Amen."



Since the beginning, the CPRC building had been used by Christians from different denominations and traditions - the Full Gospel Church, the Plymouth Brethren and others. However, as far as we could establish its history, the CPRC building had, since 1898, without interruption, been used by Christians of different traditions to worship God.

Every year, on the Sunday nearest to 12 February, the 1898 Commitment is recited together on the CPRC building's birthday.

An inner city church...


We in Cape Peninsula Reformed Church (CPRC) are... a congregation of the Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa... Which does not mean we speak Dutch. We are an English-speaking congregation, and the "Dutch" refers to the place of origin of those who brought the Reformed Church to South Africa. And of course, also to our most faithful caretaker: Mr Douwe Bleker, who was born in the Netherlands!

an inner city church...

Located right at 55a Kloof St, opposite LifeStyle Centre, where everyone would like to be. That is where we believed God called us to be a church with open doors, a family of God. Not all of those who worship at CPRC live near the church - a number of people drive in to church - but in the Kloof Street area is where we believe we should build a Christian community where people will be able to be connected to God and to one another.


a church with open doors...

Should you worship with us, 09h00 on a Sunday, expect to find here all kinds of people - of all races and classes, people from the city and from the suburbs, people with regular jobs and some homeless people without regular jobs, who live on the streets of Cape Town. a house of prayer for all the nations...


a house of prayer for all the nations...

Yes - just as the prophet Isaiah* said it would be! CPRC is a multi-cultural congregation, celebrating the diversity of cultures and kinds of people, all very different, yet united in Christ. We are conscious that we live in South Africa, with its history of racial division, and we believe a united multi-cultural congregation like CPRC and a re-unified church Dutch Reformed Church is a testimony to Jesus' words the last night He spent with his disciples: "I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, that all of them may be one, Father, as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me (John 17:20)".


a family of God...

Which we understand to mean: not a congregation consisting of families (there are just as many single people in our congregation), but a congregation striving to be a family of God, bound together by the Spirit of God.


a church rooted in the historic Christian faith...

We believe in a ministry which proclaims the love of the Father, the presence of Jesus, the crucified and risen Christ and the empowerment of the Holy Spirit. We believe God is no asking us to compromise on the essential Christian doctrines, like the Trinity - the tri-unity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit...


a church which is part of Reformed tradition...

We embrace the Reformed emphasis that the foundation of our faith is God's faithfulness to us, not our own faith; that God desires to see his glory reflected in all the dimensions of our lives; that the earth is the Lord's, and everything in it; that God had given us his law not only to expose our sins, but as a rule of thanksgiving, to live by.


a church where the Bible is explained and applied...

Because the Bible is our authoritative guideline in matters of belief and life, we try to understand the Bible in its historical context and its contemporary message for us living in the 21st century. We seek guidance in the messages from the pulpit and as we read the Bible together in house groups and cell meetings...


a church where communion is celebrated regularly...

We celebrate communion once a month, usually on the second Sunday. We believe communion is a meal that unites, and that its blessing is for those who are in fellowship with one another...


a church where we seek to be an authentic part of the body of Christ...

We are convinced that Christians are not called to be individual believers, practising their faith in isolation, but to be a body of believers, caring for and accountable to one another...